Blog

0 comments on “The bar of limitation of three years would be attracted from the date when the default occur and not from the filing of winding up petition- Jignesh Shah & Anr Vs.Union of India & Anr – Supreme Court”

The bar of limitation of three years would be attracted from the date when the default occur and not from the filing of winding up petition- Jignesh Shah & Anr Vs.Union of India & Anr – Supreme Court

Questions as to commercial solvency arise in cases covered by Sections 434(1) (c) of the Companies Act, 1956, where the debt has first to be proved, after which the Court will then look to the wishes of the other creditors and commercial solvency of the company as a whole. The stage at which the Court, therefore, examines whether the company is commercially insolvent is once it begins to hear the winding up petition for admission on merits. Limitation attaches insofar as petitions filed under Section 433(e) are concerned at the stage that default occurs for, it is at this stage that the debt becomes payable.

0 comments on “Considering Sec. 238 of the IBC, which is a subsequent Act to the Tea Act, 1953, shall be applicable & the provisions of the IBC shall have an overriding effect over the Tea Act, 1953 – Duncans Industries Ltd Vs. A. J. Agrochem – Supreme Court”

Considering Sec. 238 of the IBC, which is a subsequent Act to the Tea Act, 1953, shall be applicable & the provisions of the IBC shall have an overriding effect over the Tea Act, 1953 – Duncans Industries Ltd Vs. A. J. Agrochem – Supreme Court

The Apex Court held that considering Section 238 of the IBC, which is a subsequent Act to the Tea Act, 1953, shall be applicable and the provisions of the IBC shall have an overriding effect over the Tea Act, 1953. Any other view would frustrate the object and purpose of the IBC. If the submission on behalf of the appellant that before initiation of proceedings under Section 9 of the IBC, the consent of the Central Government as provided under Section 16G(1)(c) of the Tea Act is to be obtained, in that case, the main object and purpose of the IBC, namely, to complete the “corporate insolvency resolution process” in a time bound manner, shall be frustrated. The sum and substance of the above discussion would be that the provisions of the IBC would have an overriding effect over the Tea Act, 1953 and that no prior consent of the Central Government before initiation of the proceedings under Section 7 or Section 9 of the IBC would be required and even without such consent of the Central Government, the insolvency proceedings under Section 7 or Section 9 of the IBC initiated by the operational creditor shall be maintainable.

0 comments on “If any Corporate Guarantee is given against the provisions of the Companies Act, it is not open to any Shareholder, Director or MD to raise such issue in petition u/s 7 of the Code- Padmaiah Vuppu Vs. Reliance Capital AIF Trustee Company Pvt. Ltd. & Ors – NCLAT”

If any Corporate Guarantee is given against the provisions of the Companies Act, it is not open to any Shareholder, Director or MD to raise such issue in petition u/s 7 of the Code- Padmaiah Vuppu Vs. Reliance Capital AIF Trustee Company Pvt. Ltd. & Ors – NCLAT

The Corporate Guarantee was given by the Managing Director of the Corporate Debtor against the provisions of Section 185 of the Companies Act, 2013 and no Board or Special Resolution was passed. However, it is not in dispute that the Corporate Guarantee was executed on 2nd September, 2014 and since then the matter was not challenged by any of the Shareholder / Director of the Corporate Debtor before any competent authority or Court of Law. In such circumstance, it is not open to any Shareholder/ Director/ Managing Director to raise such issue in petition under Section 7 of the I&B Code, as the Adjudicating Authority has no jurisdiction to decide the question of legality and propriety of the Corporate Guarantee executed by the Corporate Debtor.

0 comments on “A Corporate Debtor in respect of whom a liquidation order has been made is not entitled to make application to initiate CIRP against other Corporate Debtor – Abhay N. Manudhane Vs.Gupta Coal India Pvt. Ltd – NCLAT”

A Corporate Debtor in respect of whom a liquidation order has been made is not entitled to make application to initiate CIRP against other Corporate Debtor – Abhay N. Manudhane Vs.Gupta Coal India Pvt. Ltd – NCLAT

In view of specific prohibition under Section 11 of the Code. As clause (d) of Section 11, a ‘Corporate Debtor’ in respect of whom a liquidation order has been made is not entitled to make application to initiate ‘CIRP’ under Chapter II. That means, it cannot file any application under Sections 7 or 9 of the Code. Therefore, no application under Chapter II can be filed by the ‘Corporate Debtor’, which is under Liquidation of which the Appellant is Liquidator. In so far as, sub-section (5) of Section 33 is concerned, it is subject to Section 52. Section 52 relates to right of secured creditor in liquidation proceedings. However, in case where matter does not relate to any secured asset and recovery of any money by the ‘Corporate Debtor’, which is not under Liquidation, a suit or other legal proceedings may be instituted by the Liquidator on behalf of the ‘Corporate Debtor’, but not an application under Section 9 of the Code.

0 comments on “The date of coming into force of the IBC Code does not & cannot form a trigger point of limitation for applications filed under the Code and if applications filed u/s 7, Article 137 of the Limitation Act alone will apply – Sagar Sharma & Anr Vs.Phoenix Arc Pvt. Ltd. & Anr – SC”

The date of coming into force of the IBC Code does not & cannot form a trigger point of limitation for applications filed under the Code and if applications filed u/s 7, Article 137 of the Limitation Act alone will apply – Sagar Sharma & Anr Vs.Phoenix Arc Pvt. Ltd. & Anr – SC

The Apex court held that Article 141 of the Constitution of India mandates that our judgments are followed in letter and spirit. The date of coming into force of the IBC Code does not and cannot form a trigger point of limitation for applications filed under the Code. Equally, since “applications” are petitions which are filed under the Code, it is Article 137 of the Limitation Act which will apply to such applications. Accordingly, we set aside the judgment under appeal and direct that the matter be determined afresh. It will be open for both sides to argue the case on facts on the footing that Article 137 of the Limitation Act alone will apply.

0 comments on “Resolution plan submitted by a Resolution Applicant without EoI is against the provision of Sec. 65 of the Code – Armada Singapore Pte. Ltd. Vs.Ashapura Minechem Ltd – NCLAT”

Resolution plan submitted by a Resolution Applicant without EoI is against the provision of Sec. 65 of the Code – Armada Singapore Pte. Ltd. Vs.Ashapura Minechem Ltd – NCLAT

Case Reference Case Name : Armada Singapore Pte. Ltd. Vs.Ashapura Minechem Ltd Company Appeal : Company Appeal (AT) (Insolvency) No. 350 of 2019 Appellant : Armada Singapore Pte. Ltd. Respondent : Ashapura Minechem Ltd Company Appeal : Company Appeal (AT)…

WhatsApp Bulletin-XIV